JTW > Courses > Physics Z134: Astronomy
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Online Resources For Selected Chapters

Note: if the direct links to any of the quizzes or student resources don't work, try reaching them from the Voyages web site

CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER TWO CHAPTER THREE CHAPTER SIX CHAPTER NINE CHAPTER ELEVEN CHAPTER TWELVE CHAPTER SEVENTEEN CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO
Lecture Topics
old student resources old student resources old student resources old student resources old student resources old student resources old student resources old student resources old student resources old student resources
interactive quiz interactive quiz interactive quiz interactive quiz interactive quiz interactive quiz interactive quiz interactive quiz interactive quiz interactive quiz
new student resources
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"Old" resources are from the original publisher's website and include shorter, deeper interactive quizzes. "New" resources are from publisher's new website and include the longer, more superificial quizzes which you submitted as part of your homework.

Course Information

Textbook
Fraknoi, Morrsion and Wolff, Voyages Through the Universe, Third Edition -- Media Update Edition (Harcourt College, 2006)
Syllabus

Lecture Topics

Links

Course Description

Here is a description of the course I wrote to replace the one in the Loyola Undergraduate Bulletin. It describes in more detail the range of topics to be covered:

PHYS Z134 Astronomy (3 credits)
Common Curriculum: Natural Sciences Modern

This course is designed to acquaint the non-scientist with the models which best describe our observations of the universe as well as the ways in which modern-day astronomers use those observations to deduce the nature of the universe. Topics include: astronomical explanations for phenomena such as tides, eclipses, seasons and phases of the moon; models of planetary motion from Ptolemy to Copernicus to Kepler; observed properties of planets, moons, comets and other occupants of our solar system; the structure, evolution, and eventual fate of a star.

Prerequisite: Any MATH course numbered 100 or above

Previous Course Homepages

These web pages describe previous incarnations of PHYS Z134. Note that thes past courses were less specialized to the planets, going into less depth than we will, but spending time on stars instead.


Last Modified: 2011 April 6

Dr. John T. Whelan / john.whelan@astro.rit.edu / Associate Professor, School of Mathematical Sciences & Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation, Rochester Institute of Technology

The contents of this communication are the sole responsibility of Prof. John T. Whelan and do not necessarily represent the opinions or policies of RIT, SMS, or CCRG.

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